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http://www.ChurchofJesusChristofLatterDaySaints.org

Site Version July 2013

The list of 150 follows this introductory box.

     If you were looking for famous ball players and other modern celebrities, you will not find them here. This is a list of 150 famous people who lived beside Joseph Smith, and personally knew his style. These were the scribes and clerks, his family and friends, and his general authorities. These were mostly members of his church when it was still small in the 1830s, before the church even settled at Nauvoo.

     James Strang was sustained as prophet by two other members of the first presidency, three members of the quorum of twelve, five presidents of the seventies, the president of the high priests quorum and his counselor, four men in presidencies of elders quorums, the president of the priests quorum, and eight bishops at the largest church locations including the bishop over the whole church, the patriarch over the whole church, and seven members of major stake presidencies including the Nauvoo stake president and the Kirtland stake president. He was also sustained by the presidents of the largest branches of the church, including Boston, Chicago, New York City, and Philadelphia. James Strang was believed by at least seventeen people who were personally addressed by name in the Doctrine and Covenants.

     Strang was supported by all of the family of Joseph Smith. He was joined by the mother, wife, and three sisters of Joseph Smith. He was sustained by the only surviving brother of Joseph Smith, and his brothers-in-law. He was believed by all of the living Book of Mormon witnesses, except one who was no longer a member of the church.

     Those with James Strang were the free-thinkers, the intellectuals, and the leaders. Many of the significant writers, publishers, and editors from the early church sustained James Strang. They included a dozen people that wrote what are now rare books or other imprints from the Joseph Smith period, and four who edited church-sanctioned newspapers. Five people joined who had authored separate hymn books under Joseph Smith. The artists, including the only two artists to paint Joseph Smith from life, and the only photographer of the intact Nauvoo temple, also associated with him.

     The brightest and most capable people in the church were with James Strang. Sometimes they were colorful, challenging, and charismatic, and many did not stay firm in the faith, as many did not when Joseph Smith was alive. Turnover under Joseph Smith and James Strang was similar. Those that left did so for personal reasons, for or against marriage systems or other doctrines, economic hardship, jealousy, or arguing that Joseph Smith or James Strang was a prophet but then fell. None ever said that they found evidence that James Strang was not appointed by letter from Joseph Smith.

     The people who followed Brigham Young were largely illiterate farmers and laborers from Great Britain where the twelve apostles had converted them, and only a small fraction of the church emigrated to Utah with Brigham Young in 1847. There were not enough copies of the Doctrine and Covenants printed before Joseph Smith was killed in 1844, that there was only one copy per one hundred members. So whether they could read or not, most members could not study the revelations on succession. Those that could, tended to believe James Strang rather than blindly follow a familiar person.

     Despite turnover under both Joseph Smith and James Strang, the church was larger under James Strang when he was killed in 1856 than at any other time since 1844. The following list is only a selection of some 10,000-15,000 members of the church under James Strang from 1844 to 1856, at that time about one third of the number who had been in the church when Joseph Smith was killed. These people had more authority and experience than any modern bishop, missionary, or historian who would like to keep you from believing the truth about James Strang.

     Some people feel that being a follower of James Strang makes a person an outsider, but that is not true. You would certainly be blessed to be inside the company of these other great people who were derogatorily called “Mormons” and then “Strangites.”



150 people who each knew more about
Joseph Smith than anyone alive today.

  1. George J. Adams

    Mission to Great Britain with Orson Hyde, there with most of the Twelve, 1841-1842. Ordained high priest, 1841. Authored missionary tract, 1841. Appointed to first presidency, 1842. Met with twelve and first presidency, 1843. Joseph and Hyrum Smith sent him on mission to Russia, 1843. Given two recommends by Joseph and Hyrum Smith, 1843. Heber C. Kimball humbly said “We do not profess to be polished stones like Elders . . . George J. Adams [and three others]” , 1843. Authored three missionary tracts, 1844. Ordained to be an apostle and special witness by Joseph and Hyrum Smith, June 1844. Had financial transaction with Joseph Smith, June 1844. Preached in the house of Joseph Smith, June 1844. Preached in Seventies’ Hall with Joseph Smith present, June 1844. Joseph Smith asked for him as a witness in his defense on the day when he was in Carthage Jail. Selected by Willard Richards to go east to summon the quorum of twelve apostles to come to Nauvoo after the martyrdom of Joseph Smith. Wrote that he knew Strang was appointed because he had “testimony from God by revelation” , 1846. Appointed by James Strang to be one of the associated first presidents in place of Sidney Rigdon, 1846. Ordained by James Strang to one of the counselors in the first presidency, 1849. His testimony said “I tell you I have read these things in the Urim and Thummin.” He coronated James Strang to be king, 1850.


  2. James M. Adams

    Elder in Kirtland, 1837. Mission with Book of Mormon witness Hiram Page, 1841. Mission in Ohio, 1841-1842. One of the first to preach in Nauvoo for James Strang. Served on the Voree high council, 1846, and as counselor to the president at Voree, 1846. Ordained one of the quorum of twelve apostles under James Strang, 1846. Stood up at the conference and said he knew by revelation that James Strang was the Lord’s anointed, 1847. In charge of emigration to Beaver Island, 1847.


  3. Briggs Alden

    An early member in New York. Active in Nauvoo. Received patriarchal blessing by Hyrum Smith, 1843. Associated with James Strang, 1850.

  4. Hazen Aldrich

    Converted and ordained an elder by apostle Orson Pratt. Associated with Samuel H. Smith in New Hampshire, 1832. Missionary with apostle Luke Johnson, 1832-1833. Walked with Joseph Smith from Kirtland, Ohio to Western Missouri, 1834. President of the first quorum of seventies, 1835. Ordained a high priest by Joseph Smith, 1837. Mentioned in D&C. High priest at Kirtland under James Strang, and one of his most active supporters at Kirtland, 1846. Emigrated to Voree, 1847.

  5. William Aldrich

    Lived in Jackson County, Missouri, during the turbulent period 1831-1833. Lived in Kirtland, Ohio, 1836-1838. Stockholder in Kirtland Safety Society Bank, 1837. Emigrated with Joseph Smith to area of Far West, Missouri, 1838. Emigrated to Voree to be with James Strang, where he eventually became a Wisconsin state legislator. Marvin M. Aldrich, apparently his brother, became one of the most loyal supporters and highest officers of James Strang, 1846-1856, serving as high priest, high council member, presiding high priest, president of the Beaver Island stake, judge, and counselor to the first president.

  6. Naomi Alvord

    A friend of the Whitmer family, who wrote to James Strang from Far West, Missouri, 1846. A sister-in-law of George Walters, who likewise supported James Strang until 1849.

  7. Benjamin Andrews

    Was acquainted with Joseph Smith for seven years. Correspondent of and contributor to the Times and Seasons from Maine. An articulate personal defender of Joseph Smith. Ordained counselor to the Voree stake president, and signed recommend of James Strang, 1846. Defender of James Strang, 1849.

  8. John W. Archer

    Church member by 1835. Driven by mobs from both Clay and Caldwell Counties, Missouri. Ordained a high priest. Lived at Nauvoo. As a high priest, certified confidence in James Strang, 1846. On the Voree high council, 1847. Chief stone mason in Voree, 1848.

  9. Daniel Avery

    Persecuted by mob in Missouri, 1838. Ordained president of the quorum of elders, Iowa, 1840. Recommended by Brigham Young, Heber C. Kimball, and Willard Woodruff, 1842. Kidnaped in Illinois and taken to Missouri during persecution, 1843. Defended by Joseph Smith, 1843. On Voree high council, 1846-1848, with high council meetings held at his house.

  10. Amos Babcock

    Moved to Kirtland to be with Joseph Smith, 1835. Received endowment in Kirtland Temple, 1837. Elder in Kirtland, 1836. President of the quorum of elders, Kirtland, 1841-1842. Sustained James Strang at a conference in Kirtland, Ohio, and became assistant president of the stake at Kirtland, organized by James Strang, 1846-1848.

  11. William Backenstos

    Married by Joseph Smith in the Mansion House, 1843. Sheriff of Hancock County, Illinois, the location of Nauvoo. Agent for the Voree Herald near Nauvoo, 1845.

  12. Heman A. Basset

    The youngest men mentioned in the D&C were Heman A. Basset and Joseph Smith, both seventeen years old when mentioned. Baptized, 1830. Living in a united order in Kirtland, 1830. Ordained elder, 1831. Acquainted with Joseph Smith. Active in the church under James Strang in New York City, 1849-1850, and ordained into the quorum of seventy.

  13. John C. Bennett

    Physician. Major general of the Nauvoo militia. Mayor of Nauvoo. Assistant president in the first presidency, 1841. Mentioned in D&C 124:16-17. Withdrew from the church, 1842. Repented and was rebaptized, 1846. Recommended James Strang, 1846. Ordained high priest, and restored to his prior standing in the first presidency, 1846.  In contact with James Strang, 1850.

  14. Samuel Bennett

    Thermometer maker. Chosen to preside over the Philadelphia branch when Joseph Smith personally organized it in 1839. Authored Mormon missionary tract, 1840. Ordained into the quorum of twelve apostles under James Strang, 1846, served until 1853, and remained faithful.

  15. Gladden Bishop

    A colorful member since 1832. One of a quorum of seventy, 1836. Wrote and published a history of the church, 1839. Had come to Voree, and declared the validity of James Strang’s ministry, 1848.

  16. Samuel Blair

    Persecuted in Missouri, 1838. A missionary in Wisconsin. Associated with James Strang, at least 1848-1854. After the martyrdom of James Strang, helped found the Reorganized Church.

  17. James Blakeslee

    Church member since 1832. Possibly the most successful Mormon missionary ever, baptizing over one thousand members into the early church. Preached on foot through twelve states, Canada, and Great Britain. Emigrated to Voree to be with James Strang, 1847. A member of the Voree high council, 1847. High council meetings were held at his house, 1847. Ordained president of the quorum of high priests, 1848. Ordained into the quorum of twelve apostles, 1849. Settled on Beaver Island, Michigan, 1849.

  18. Walter M. Blanchard

    An elder in Kirtland with Joseph Smith, 1837. Wrote: “I asked the God of Israel to give me a testimony concerning the appointment of Brother James Strang, and received it to my satisfaction, and that is forever settled with me.” Appointed by James Strang to be a presiding high priest in Ohio, 1847.

  19. Daniel Bliss

    Walked from Kirtland, Ohio to Far West, Missouri, with Joseph Smith, 1838. Sustained James Strang at a conference in Kirtland, Ohio, and became a member of the high council of the stake at Kirtland, organized by James Strang, 1846.

  20. James C. Brewster

    As a minor, founded his own church back in Kirtland days, giving him a unique association with Joseph Smith, but later said that Voree was “a place of refuge and safety for the Saints,” 1846.

  21. Jason W. Briggs

    Was a missionary in Wisconsin. After the martyrdom of James Strang, helped found the Reorganized Church. Jason W. Briggs had been affiliated with James Strang for longer than ever disclosed by the Reorganized Church, from April 1846 until July 1851; he had been ordained to be a high priest by James Strang himself; he had promoted James Strang’s united order; he had proclaimed by “revelation” that Joseph Smith Jr. wrote the document appointing James Strang; and he remained in the church during the kingdom and while polygamy was practiced.

  22. Lester Brooks

    Lived in Kirtland, 1837. Endowed in Kirtland temple with Joseph Smith, 1837. Moved to area of Far West, Missouri, 1838. Returned to Kirtland, 1841-1843. Councilor in the Kirtland stake presidency, 1841. Important enough to own a rare Book of Commandments. Ordained into quorum of twelve apostles under James Strang, 1846. Went on mission to Great Britain with Martin Harris to present claims of James Strang, 1847. Active for James Strang in Buffalo, New York, 1849-1850.

  23. Hiram P. Brown

    Priesthood holder in Michigan since 1841. Joseph and Hyrum Smith personally involved in his case in 1844. One of the first people to see the Voree Plates, 1845. Ordained as one of the seven presidents of seventies under James Strang, 1849. Said: “The spirit of the testimony of Jesus rested upon me and I arose and bore testimony by the spirit and power of God, which sunk deeply into the hearts of the honest saints, that God through Joseph appointed J. J. Strang to be Prophet, Seer and Revelator . . .” , 1849. Ordained to the quorum of twelve apostles, 1850. Active through 1851.

  24. Jacob Bump

    Recognized for work and contributions to Kirtland Temple. Sat in high council with Joseph Smith in Kirtland, 1834. Sustained James Strang at a conference in Kirtland, Ohio, and became bishop of the stake at Kirtland, organized by James Strang, 1846.

  25. Thomas Cahoon

    Living in Kirtland, 1830. Active elder, 1832. He built the translating house for Joseph Smith in Kirtland. Related to Reynolds Cahoon, who was one of the most important early members of the church beginning in 1830. Leaned towards James Strang, 1849.

  26. Jared Carter

    Baptized, 1831. One of the earliest and most successful missionaries in the church. Worked on the Kirtland Temple, 1834. Served in on the high council in Kirtland and Far West. A high priest in Far West, Missouri, 1838. Mentioned in D&C 52:38; 79: 2-3; 94:14; 102:3. “And I will send upon him the Comforter, which shall teach him the truth and the way whither he shall go; and inasmuch as he is faithful, I will crown him again with sheaves.” Moved to Voree to be with James Strang, 1846.

  27. Luman Carter

    Receive special blessing for helping build and consecrate to the Kirtland temple, 1835. Taught “vocal music” in temple, 1837. One of the original shareholders in the Kirtland Safety Society Bank. Sustained James Strang at a conference in Kirtland, Ohio, and became a member of the high council of the stake at Kirtland, organized by James Strang, 1846.

  28. Samuel Chambers

    Samuel Chambers was an African-American, a former Virginia slave who converted to the church in Mississippi down river from Nauvoo in 1844. This is probably the same Samuel Chambers who served as commissioner of highways, justice of the peace, and sheriff, in Charlevoix Township and Emmet County, Michigan. He was an active supporter of James Strang, 1851-1855, who was settled as part of the new Mormon settlement on South Fox Island, Lake Michigan. Evidently related to Thomas Chambers, who was superintendent of the poor in Michilimackinac County, Michigan, 1851.

  29. Calvin B. Childs

    Elder at Kirtland, 1836. Ordained by Strang to be a presiding high priest in New York, served 1846-1848.

  30. Isaac Cleveland

    Received blessing for work and contributions to Kirtland temple, 1835. Shareholder in Kirtland Bank, 1837. Ordained elder, 1837. Moved to area of Far West, Missouri, with Joseph Smith, 1838. Persecuted. Moved to Nauvoo, 1839. With James Strang, 1846-1850.

  31. James W. Cooper

    Joseph Smith received revelation, D&C 105, while camped with expedition on his land next to Fishing River, Missouri. With James Strang, 1847-1850.

  32. William Cowdery

    The father of Oliver Cowdery, the Book of Mormon witness. President of the quorum of priests, Kirtland, 1836. Clerk of the Kirtland high council, 1837. Sustained James Strang at a conference in Kirtland, Ohio, and became a member of the high council of the stake at Kirtland, organized by James Strang. Oliver Cowdery was a distinguished lawyer in Walworth County, Wisconsin, as was James Strang, practicing law in the same courthouse in the county where Voree was located, 1847-1848. James Strang and Oliver Cowdery were loyal friends. Oliver Cowdery was the only living Book of Mormon witness who is not known for certain to have followed James Strang, but he was not affiliated with any Mormon group at that time.

  33. Austin Cowles

    Baptized, 1832. Served on high council in Nauvoo, 1840-1841. Counselor to the Nauvoo stake president, 1841-1843. In confidential meeting with Joseph Smith regarding eternal marriage, 1843. Supervisor of streets in Nauvoo. His teenage daughter lived with Joseph and Emma Smith as a housekeeper, and Mormon historians say she was sealed to Joseph Smith as a polygamous wife, making Austin Cowles the father-in-law of Joseph Smith. Accepted the claims of James Strang and addressed him as president of the church. Appointed by James Strang to be presiding high priest over district of Kirtland, 1847-1848. Wrote to James Strang, “I need not remind you, sir, of the unanimity of feeling and harmony of action that marked all of the movements of your administration in organizing a stake in this place.”

  34. John W. Crane

    Received patriarchal blessing by Joseph Smith, Sr., in Kirtland, 1836. Served on the Voree high council, 1846. Appointed by James Strang to be bishop over the whole church, 1847.

  35. Theodore Curtis

    Converted in New York City by Parley P. Pratt, 1837. Missionary to Ireland, 1840. Imprisoned in England for preaching, 1841. Joseph Smith wrote in his journal that he received “a good pencil case, sent me by Brother Theodore Curtis, who is now in New York; and the first words I wrote with it were, “God bless the man!” Planned to move to Voree, 1847.

  36. Henry Deam

    Baptized, 1836. Ordained to be one of the seventies in Far West, Missouri, 1839. Treasurer of a branch under James Strang, 1848. After the martyrdom of James Strang, helped found the Reorganized Church.

  37. Israel Duty

    Elder in Kirtland with Joseph Smith, 1836. Supported James Strang and emigrated to Voree, 1847-1849.

  38. Simon Dyke

    Received patriarchal blessing by Joseph Smith Sr., in Kirtland, 1836. On Beaver Island with James Strang as one of the quorum of seventy, 1855.

  39. Benjamin C. Elsworth

    Doctor. Ordained a teacher in Canada, 1837. Authored Mormon hymn book, 1839. Had baptized one thousand people. Ordained senior president of quorum of seventies under James Strang, 1846. Appointed by James Strang into the quorum of twelve apostles,1847. One of the first emigrants to Beaver Island with James Strang, 1847.

  40. Asa Field

    Walked from Kirtland, Ohio to Western Missouri with Joseph Smith, 1834. Very active on Beaver Island with James Strang, 1850-1854. Constable on Beaver Island, 1851. Made longest bow and arrow shot in Beaver Island contest. Polygamist on Beaver Island with three wives, more than most.

  41. Lucian R. Foster

    The daguerreotype artist who made the famous photographs of the Nauvoo temple. With John Taylor, W. W. Phelps, and William Smith, was one of five members of the platform committee at the national presidential convention in Baltimore, when Joseph Smith was candidate for president, 1844. Lived in Nauvoo, 1845-1846. Besides Brigham Young, one of the first to go through the Nauvoo temple endowment, 1845. Under Joseph Smith, he presided over the branch in New York City, 1841-1842. Under James Strang, he presided over the branch in New York City, 1846-1849.

  42. Amos B. Fuller

    Baptized, 1833. Ordained, 1835. A relative of Joseph Smith, evidently his uncle. Received patriarchal blessing by Joseph Smith Sr., Kirtland, 1836. Ordained to be one of the seventy, 1837. Moved to Far West, Missouri, with church camp, 1838. Persecuted in Missouri with Joseph Smith. Joseph Smith directed a written unpublished revelation to him on December 22, 1841. Colonel in the Iowa militia. Assistant president of the Voree stake, 1846. Served on the high council with James Strang, 1846. Appointed by James Strang to be bishop over the whole church, 1846. Directed letter to Emma Smith, expressing “the most unqualified confidence in [James Strang] as the prophet of God and as an honest man.” Received endowment in Voree with James Strang, 1847.

  43. John Gaylord

    Ordained one of the presidents of seventy, Kirtland, 1837. Served as clerk of the quorum of elders in Kirtland, 1840. Associated with James Strang in Kirtland, 1846. Had been in Kirtland and “bore his testimony in favor” of James Strang. Moved from Nauvoo to Voree to be with James Strang. Signed recommendation of James Strang as prophet, seer, revelator, and translator, 1846. President of the quorum of elders under James Strang, 1846. President of the Voree stake, 1846-1847.

  44. Darius S. Gibbs.

    A member in Clay County, Missouri, 1836. Joined James Strang, 1846.

  45. Ichabod Gifford

    Baptized, 1834. His father was baptized in 1831, and was the elder whom converted Brigham Young and Heber C. Kimball to Mormonism, but had died in Nauvoo in 1841. Associated with James Strang, 1849. Present on Beaver Island, 1850.

  46. Samuel Graham

    Family were members in Michigan since 1833. Clerk of Michigan conferences. Influential in Michigan where James Strang first presented his claims in 1844, and later settled in 1847. Wrote: “I am willing to give my name to the world as one that is satisfied, from investigation, and also by the Holy Spirit of God, that J. J. Strang, is the only rightful heir to the first presidency, (to wit) to be a prophet, seer, and revelator . . .” Ordained into the quorum of twelve apostles by James Strang, 1848. President of the quorum of twelve, 1849. Settled on Beaver Island, Michigan, with James Strang, 1849. One of the witnesses to the Book of the Law of the Lord, 1851. Never denied his testimony. Viceroy in the kingdom, 1851.

  47. Harvey Green

    Missionary, 1831. Persecuted and driven from Jackson County, Missouri, 1833. Experience in the Kirtland temple with Joseph Smith present. President of the quorum of elders in Far West, 1838. Clerk of the high council in Far West, 1838. Driven from Far West. High priest, and appointed into the presidency over Michigan, 1844. Initially opposed even hearing the claims of James Strang in Michigan, 1844, but ultimately joined him on Beaver Island, Michigan, 1850.

  48. John P. Greene

    An elder in Kirtland, 1832. On the Kirtland, Far West, and Nauvoo high council, 1834-1844. Author of Mormon historical tract, 1839. City marshal in Nauvoo, member of the city council in Nauvoo, and a member of the council of fifty. Best friend of Joseph Smith. Advised Joseph Smith to appoint Strang, and assisted him with the letter of appointment, according to Joseph Smith’s brother William Smith.. Emma Smith said her husband Joseph received a letter from James Strang; and remembered that they held a council on the subject; and named Hyrum Smith, Willard Richards and John P. Greene as present at that council; and said that a letter was sent to James Strang. Greene stood up in conference in Nauvoo in August 1844 and said: “Joseph had appointed one to stand in his stead,” that he lived “up north a considerable distance,” and that his name was “Strang—“James J. Strang,” that he was “a young man” " and that he had been to Nauvoo and that “Joseph baptized him.” Allegedly martyred by poison in Nauvoo, September 1844, for disclosing that James Strang was appointed by Joseph Smith.

  49. John Greenhow

    Converted by John Taylor in England, 1840. Gathered to Nauvoo, 1842. Had been an employee of the Times and Seasons newspaper published at Nauvoo. Was stereotyping the Doctrine and Covenants in Pittsburgh for private publication in Great Britain, 1845. Was the presiding elder of the Philadelphia branch, 1846. Emigrated to Voree to be with James Strang, 1846. President of the quorum of high priests under James Strang, 1846. Edited the Voree Herald/Zion’s Reveille, 1846-1847. Ordained to be one of the quorum of twelve apostles under James Strang, 1847. Lived in the same house with James Strang, 1847. Received his endowment in Voree, 1847.

  50. Ethan Griffith

    A rising elder in Nauvoo. Supported James Strang, 1848-1854. After the martyrdom of James Strang, helped found the Reorganized Church.

  51. Michael Griffith

    Walked with Joseph Smith from Kirtland, Ohio, to Western Missouri, 1834. Ordained by Joseph Smith into the first quorum of seventies, 1835. In the church at Voree, 1847.

  52. Zenus H. Gurley

    According to Christopher Merkley, active in the church in 1837. Ordained one of the seventies at Far West, Missouri, by John Taylor, Brigham Young, and Heber C. Kimball, 1839. Traveling agent for the temple and for the Times and Seasons, in Wisconsin and Illinois, 1841-1844. After the martyrdom of James Strang, helped found the Reorganized Church. Zenus H. Gurley had been with James Strang longer than acknowledged by the Reorganized Church, from when he was rebaptized in June 1849 until he was excommunicated in July 1852; he had served as a seventy and a missionary; he had performed sealings for the dead; he had participated within the domain of the kingdom ruled by James Strang, and he had prophesied success to that kingdom; and he remained in the church while polygamy was practiced.

  53. Alden Hale

    A relative of Joseph Smith (cousin of Emma Hale). Loyal supporter of James Strang, 1846-1856. Ordained a high priest in Voree, 1848. Known for healing members on his mission. Assistant president of Voree Stake, 1849. He and his son Charles were lighthouse keepers on Lake Michigan. He and Charles were arrested for their defense of James Strang. Persecuted with Charles at gunpoint in boat off Mackinac Island for their defense of James Strang. His son, Andrew J. Hale, was similarly persecuted. A mob at Lake Mormon (now Lake Charlevoix), Michigan, shot Andrew through the shoulder, cutting the main artery. Emma’s first cousin, William Hale, also supported James Strang.

  54. John W. Halliday

    Persecuted in Missouri with Joseph Smith. Went on a mission from Nauvoo to England. In Voree with James Strang as counselor to the bishop, high priest, and member of the high council, 1846-1849.

  55. John Hardy

    Authored missionary tract, 1842. President of the Boston branch, 1843-1844. Authored Mormon hymn book, 1843. Reported as numbered with James Strang, 1846-1847.

  56. Martin Harris

    Funded the printing of the first Book of Mormon. One of the three witnesses to the Book of Mormon. Baptized, 1830. Walked with Joseph Smith from Kirtland, Ohio, to Western Missouri. Appointed to choose the first quorum of twelve apostles. Mentioned throughout the D&C. Sustained James Strang at a conference in Kirtland, Ohio, and became a member of the high council of the stake at Kirtland, organized by James Strang, 1846. Went on a mission to England to preach for James Strang, 1846-1847.  Thrown in jail in England for preaching about James Strang.

  57. Preserved Harris

    The brother of Martin Harris. Saw the missing manuscript to the early 116 pages of the Book of Mormon, as allowed personally by Joseph Smith after receiving a revelation, 1828. Joseph Smith preached in his home, 1830 and 1835. Baptized, 1830. Sustained James Strang at a conference in Kirtland, Ohio, and became a member of the high council of the stake at Kirtland, organized by James Strang, 1846.

  58. John Henderson

    Had been a Methodist public speaker in Missouri, assigned to debate Mormons. Instead, baptized and ordained at Far West, 1838. Witness to severe persecution in Missouri, where Joseph Smith lived, in both Far West and in Adam-ondi-Ahman. An intellectual and saw mill owner on Beaver Island with James Strang, 1852-1856.

  59. Peter Hess

    Brigham Young stayed at his house in Philadelphia, 1843. High priest in Philadelphia under Joseph Smith, 1844. Active for James Strang in the East, including Philadelphia, Baltimore, New York City, and Niagara Falls, 1846-1849. Counselor to presiding elder in Philadelphia, 1846. Presiding elder in Philadelphia, 1849-1850.

  60. Lorenzo D. Hickey

    Acquainted with Martin Harris in early Palmyra, New York. Labored on the Nauvoo temple with Joseph Smith. Missionary or seventy in Michigan, 1842-1844. One of the most important and faithful supporters of James Strang, 1846-1856. Ordained into the quorum of twelve apostles under James Strang, 1849. His wife, Sarah Ann Hickey, was one of the more influential women on Beaver Island. His granddaughter’s husband still holds priesthood in the church today.

  61. Nathaniel Holmes

    One of the earliest members of the church, 1833. Wilford Woodruff stayed in his home, 1837. Presided over branches in Massachusetts, 1833-1834, including Rowley and Georgetown. Wilford Woodruff stayed in his home, 1837. An elderly and respected member of the church, the father of Jonathan Holmes and Milton Holmes, early seventies (Jonathan lived in the home of Joseph Smith, 1834). Nathaniel was ordained presiding high priest over Boston branch by Wilford Woodruff, 1844. Supported James Strang at the Boston conference, 1847, and until his death, 1849. His wife, Abigail P. Holmes, remained faithful after his death, 1849—�.

  62. Milton Holmes

    Under Joseph Smith, was a missionary, 1834-1837. Walked with Joseph Smith from Kirtland, Ohio, to Western Missouri, 1834. Remained in Clay County, Missouri, 1834. Sent by Joseph Smith as missionary to Canada with apostle Lyman E. Johnson, 1835, and then recalled to Kirtland by correspondence from Joseph Smith personally. Ordained into a quorum of seventy, 1836. Moved from the second quorum of seventy to the first quorum of seventy, 1837. Missionary traveling with Wilford Woodruff, 1837, 1844. Missionary to Great Britain with Wilford Woodruff and the twelve apostles. Had been appointed by Brigham Young to be president of an improperly organized quorum of seventies. Under the twelve, presided over the conference in Manchester, England, 1845. Under James Strang, was the presiding high priest over the district of Salem, Massachusetts, 1847.

  63. Lydia Hubbard

    An important female member since 1833. Supported Strang, 1850.

  64. Lewis Jackson

    Baptized by Parley Pratt, 1831, while Pratt was traveling with Joseph Smith near Kirtland, Ohio. Emigrated from Council Bluffs, Iowa, to Beaver Island, Lake Michigan, to be with James Strang.

  65. Joseph Ketchum

    One of the earliest members of the church. Driven from Jackson County, Missouri, 1833. Driven from Clay County. In teachers quorum in Kirtland, Ohio, when teachers were adult men, 1835. Driven from Far West, Missouri, 1839. Ordained into quorum of seventies under James Strang, 1846. Tailor in Voree with James Strang, 1848. Ordained to be a prince and noble in the kingdom, 1850. Hosted public dinner at St. James Castle, 1851. Persecuted and falsely taken captive from Beaver Island by government, 1851.

  66. Eunice Kinney

    A sister in the church who was baptized by Elijah Abel, an African-American elder, in 1838, and apparently knew Joseph Smith personally. She was a devoted member of the church with James Strang, testifying of exceptionally spiritual environmental events that happened when James Strang was shot by persecutors.

  67. John Landers

    Persecuted in Missouri with Joseph Smith, 1839. A successful missionary in Illinois, 1839-1840. Ordained a high priest by James Strang, 1846. Living on Beaver Island with James Strang, 1854.

  68. George T. Leach

    Appointed to preside over the church in New York City, 1843, and as such was constantly entertaining the twelve apostles passing through. Editor and publisher of the church newspaper, The Prophet, in New York City, 1844. Active in the church in New York City under James Strang, 1849. Preached for James Strang in Baltimore and Philadelphia, 1850.

  69. Christian Lehman

    Member of the church in Philadelphia since 1837, where Joseph Smith visited. Married by William Smith, 1841. High priest, 1849. Visited Beaver Island, and returned as missionary to Baltimore and Philadelphia, 1849. As reported, “He has bore the strongest testimony for Bro. Strang and Beaver Island I have heard from anyone, and has left his business, and has gone to preaching.”

  70. William Marks

    On Kirtland high council, 1837. Agent to bishop at Kirtland. Stake president at Kirtland, 1838. Mentioned in D&C 117; 124:79. Nauvoo stake president, 1839-1844. Bodyguard of Joseph Smith. Helped prepare the bodies of Joseph and Hyrum Smith for burial. Member of the council of fifty. Under James Strang he served as president of the high priests’ quorum, as well as bishop and vice president of the church. After the martyrdom of James Strang, helped found the Reorganized Church. William Marks was more involved than the Reorganized Church discloses today. He served under James Strang from January 1846 until July 1850, he was ordained by James Strang to be his assistant in the first presidency of the whole church, he broke ground for the temple planned by James Strang, he administered baptisms for the dead, and he announced that he knew by “revelation” that James Strang’s work was the will of God. His house is still standing at the Nauvoo, Illinois historic site.

  71. P. Matteson

    A printer from Nauvoo who helped Joseph Smith print the famed Kinderhook plates, volunteered to be a printer for James Strang, 1846.

  72. Sutcliffe Maudsley

    Next door neighbor of Joseph Smith, an English pattern maker and shoemaker. Artist of the well known profile portraits of the Smith family, including Joseph, Hyrum, Emma Hale, Lucy Mack, and children. Associated with James Strang in 1850 and remained in the Midwest.

  73. John MacAuley

    Baptized, 1840 at Glasgow, Scotland. Ordained a high priest in 1842 and presided over the Glasglow and Paisley conferences. Emigrated to Nauvoo, 1844. Supported James Strang, 1849-1850.

  74. William E. McLellin

    Baptized by Hyrum Smith, 1831. Lived with Joseph Smith for three weeks in Kirtland, Ohio. Mentioned throughout the D&C. Went on mission to Missouri with Parley P. Pratt. Member of the high council in Clay County, Missouri. Taught in the school of the elders in Kirtland. On Kirtland high council. Ordained to the quorum of twelve apostles, 1835. Served as clerk of the quorum of twelve apostles in Kirtland. Owned a Book of Commandments. Was reordained to be one of the quorum of twelve apostles by James Strang, 1846.

  75. Sophronia Smith McLerie

    The sister of Joseph Smith and Hyrum Smith. Signed statement, “This is to certify that the Smith family do believe in the appointment of J. J. Strang,” 1846.

  76. Joel McWithee

    Received special blessing for work and contributions to the Kirtland temple, 1835. Member of a quorum of seventy, 1836. Endowed in Kirtland temple, 1836. Ordained a high priest under James Strang, 1846. Served on Voree high council under James Strang, 1846.

  77. Frederick Merryweather

    Doctor. Secretary of the Illinois political convention at Nauvoo, 1844. Delegate from Hancock County (location of Nauvoo) to national political convention when Joseph Smith ran for president. Postmaster in Nauvoo. Ordained a high priest by James Strang, 1846. Presiding high priest in Cincinnati for James Strang, 1847. His name still appears on the post office at the Nauvoo, Illinois, historic site.

  78. George Miller

    Baptized by John Taylor, 1839. Ordained a high priest by Joseph Smith and Hyrum Smith, 1840. Bishop in Nauvoo, 1841-1844. President of the high priests’ quorum, 1841-1844. Brigadier general in the Nauvoo militia, 1842-1844. “And again, verily I say unto you, my servant George Miller is without guile; he may be trusted because of the integrity of his heart; and for the love which he has to my testimony I, the Lord, love him. . . . Let no man despise my servant George, for he shall honor me” (D&C 124: 20-21). Member of the council of fifty, 1844. Supposedly one of the few people receiving the full Nauvoo endowment while Joseph Smith was still alive. Besides Brigham Young, one of the of the first to go through the Nauvoo temple endowment, 1845. Ordained by James Strang to be a “prince, privy counselor, and general-in-chief” in the kingdom, and served 1850-1856. Presided over general assembly in absence of James Strang. Elected sheriff of Mackinac and then Manitue County, Michigan. Died shortly after James Strang was killed.

  79. Reuben Miller

    Joined the church, 1843. Called to be a bishop in Norway, Illinois, 1844. Besides Brigham Young, one of the first to go through the Nauvoo temple endowment, 1845. Sent by Brigham Young to debate James Strang, but converted by James Strang instead even after consulting with the quorum of twelve apostles for their defense, 1846. Published the first pamphlet defending James Strang, 1846. President of the Voree stake, 1846. Testified that he knew by revelation that Strang was appointed.

  80. Arthur Milliken

    The brother-in-law of Joseph Smith and Hyrum Smith. Joined the church in 1835, lived in Kirtland, was wounded in Missouri persecutions at the battle of Crooked River. Signed statement: “This is to certify that the Smith family do believe in the appointment of J. J. Strang.” Signed statement, “This is to certify that we, the undersigned members of the Smith family, fully accord with the sentiments expressed above,” including “I am satisfied that Joseph appointed J. J. Strang. It is verily so.”

  81. Lucy Smith Milliken

    The sister of Joseph Smith and Hyrum Smith. Signed statement: “This is to certify that the Smith family do believe in the appointment of J. J. Strang.” Signed statement, “This is to certify that we, the undersigned members of the Smith family, fully accord with the sentiments expressed above,” including “I am satisfied that Joseph appointed J. J. Strang. It is verily so.”

  82. Samuel Newcomb

    Medical doctor. Missionary from Kirtland, 1833. Lived in Kirtland, Ohio, along with Joseph Smith, 1835-1838. Received endowment in Kirtland temple, 1836. Signed charter of Kirtland Safety Society Bank, 1837. Sustained James Strang, 1846. Moved to Utah, even though “he believed Brigham Young was an imposter.”

  83. Reuben T. Nichols

    Baptized by Warren Parrish, 1833. Ordained to a teacher by apostles Orson Pratt and Luke Johnson, 1836. Was given special authority to lay on hands to heal, which he reportedly did successfully. Ordained an elder, 1839. Ordained a high priest, 1845. Re-ordained a high priest in Voree, 1846. Appointed to be a presiding high priest in New York, 1846-1847. Settled on Beaver Island, then Lake Mormon (now Lake Charlevoix), Michigan. Mobbed from his home after the martyrdom of James Strang in 1856.

  84. Mrs. Freeman Nickerson

    Her husband walked from Kirtland, Ohio, to Western Missouri with Joseph Smith, 1834. Her husband went on a special mission to Canada with Joseph Smith. Besides Brigham Young, one of the first to go through the Nauvoo temple endowment, 1845. She moved to Voree to be with James Strang after the death of her husband.

  85. Uriel Nickerson

    Baptized, 1833. Driven from Jackson County, Missouri, 1833. Walked from Kirtland, Ohio, to Western Missouri with Joseph Smith, 1834. Persecuted in Missouri along with Joseph Smith, 1839. In charge of rescuing Joseph Smith who fled over the Mississippi, 1841. Received a patriarchal blessing by Hyrum Smith at Nauvoo, 1843. Joseph Smith settled a court case for him, 1843. Counselor to the Voree stake president, 1846-1848. Mission through Nauvoo, saw the Nauvoo temple, and visited Emma Hale and Lucy Mack, as an emissary from James Strang, 1847. Visited the Brigham Young camp when one-fourth died, 1847. Stood up at the conference and said he knew by revelation that James Strang was the Lord’s anointed, 1847. In charge of the emigration to Beaver Island. Returned to Beaver Island, 1850. Settled in Lake Geneva, Wisconsin, near Voree.

  86. Esther Ormsby

    Wife of Gideon Ormsby. They lived at Kirtland, 1834-1838. Her husband received blessing for working on temple, 1835. Her husband was ordained an elder, 1836. Her husband was endowed in the Kirtland temple, 1836. She received her patriarchal blessing from Joseph Smith, Sr., in Kirtland, 1836. Lived in Clay County, Missouri, 1836. Moved to Far West, Missouri, 1836. Fled Missouri during persecutions, 1839. Returned to Kirtland where they lived, 1840-1842. Knew Joseph Smith personally at the time of his martyrdom. Supported James Strang, 1846.

  87. Noah Packard

    Baptized by Parley P. Pratt, 1832. Ordained elder by Joseph Smith,1832. Gave enormous sums of money to the church for debts and building the Kirtland temple. Acquainted with Joseph Smith. Ordained high priest, 1836. Served on the Kirtland high council. Mentioned in D&C 124:136. Served as counselor to Don C. Smith, Joseph’s brother, the president of the high priests’ quorum. In Nauvoo, 1840. Lived in Wisconsin, 1846-1850. Present when James Strang was crowned king in Michigan, 1850.

  88. Isaac Paden

    In January 1846, he was president of the branch in Knoxville, Illinois, northeast of Nauvoo, and was dismayed that the “principle part” of his branch had joined James Strang. By February, though, he himself joined James Strang. In April 1847, he was appointed to be the presiding high priest over the district of Nauvoo and southern Illinois.

  89. Ebenezer Page

    Ordained apparently by Joseph Smith, 1830. Missionary near the first church branch at Colesville, New York, 1830. Possibly ordained a high priest by Joseph Smith, 1831. Missionary in the state of New York with Jared Carter, 1831. Ordained his brother, later apostle John E. Page, to be an elder, 1833. Ordained one of the seventies, by Joseph Smith, 1836. Was charged together with Joseph Smith allegedly for the “several crimes of high treason against the state, murder, burglary, arson, robbery, and larceny,” as part of the Missouri persecutions, 1839. Bishop and counselor to stake president for a small satellite stake outside Nauvoo, 1840. Ordained a high priest by James Strang, 1846. Ordained a presiding high priest by James Strang, 1846. Ordained into the quorum of twelve apostles by James Strang, 1847. Presided over Beaver Island stake, 1847. One of the witnesses to the Book of the Law of the Lord, 1851. Never denied his testimony. Apparently senior member of the quorum of twelve apostles, 1853-1856. Ordained Wingfield Watson to be an elder, 1858, through whom priesthood in the church still exists.

  90. Hiram Page

    One of the eight witnesses to the Book of Mormon. Married to a daughter of Peter Whitmer. Baptized, 1830. Settled in Jackson County, Missouri, 1831. Mentioned in D&C 28. A high priest in Far West, Missouri, 1838. Hiram Page wrote to James Strang in early 1846 indicating that David Whitmer, John Whitmer, and Hiram Page received a tract about his succession claims and “read it with joy and gladness,” and “all the witnesses of the Book of Mormon living in that region received the news with gladness,” and addressed James Strang “as a prophet of God to tell them what to do.” In a second letter from April 1847, they also invited James Strang to come to Missouri and get the “church records, and manuscript revelations.” He died in 1852. His son, Philander, was a documented supporter of James Strang as late as 1854, making it likely that Hiram Page was a member of the church with Strang at his death.

  91. John E. Page

    Baptized and ordained by Ebenezer Page, 1833. An elder with Joseph Smith in Kirtland, 1835. Ordained one of the seventy, 1836. Ordained into the quorum of twelve apostles, 1838. Authored Mormon hymn book, 1839. Authored missionary tracts, 1841, 1843, and 1844. Mentioned in D&C 118:6; 124:129. Member of the council of fifty. Edited church newspapers at Pittsburgh, 1843-1844, and at the death of Joseph Smith. Besides Brigham Young, one of the of the first to go through the Nauvoo temple endowment, 1845. Chosen president of the quorum of twelve apostles under James Strang, 1846-1849. Edited the Gospel Herald, 1846-1849. “. . . often asserted that he knew by revelation of God that Mr. Strang was a prophet, and the true successor of Joseph Smith in the Presidency of the church of the living God.”

  92. Azariah Parrish

    The brother of Warren Parrish, one of the most successful early missionaries in the church beginning, 1833-1837. Warren Parish was the scribe and close associate of Joseph Smith who wrote out the manuscript for the first vision, the Book of Abraham, and the journal of Joseph Smith. Azariah is known to have lived near Voree in 1850, and lived on Beaver Island, at least 1850 to 1854.

  93. Ira J. Patten

    Brother to David W. Patten, who was a member of the quorum of twelve apostles and president of the church in Missouri, who was martyred in Missouri. Ira was baptized by Brigham Young, 1833. Ira was agent for the Times and Seasons newspaper, 1843. Ordained to high priesthood by James Strang, 1846. Served as a member of the quorum of twelve apostles under James Strang, 1847-1850.

  94. Collins Pemberton

    Traveled with Brigham Young in Cincinnati, 1843, using his skiff to transport the apostles by river through the region. Signed recommendation of Strang as prophet, seer, revelator, and translator, 1846. Ordained junior president of seventies, 1846.

  95. Joseph T. Pendleton

    His daughter received a patriarchal blessing at Far West, Missouri, by Joseph Smith, Sr., 1838, so he doubtlessly knew the Smith family early. His brother, Calvin C. Pendleton, was the clerk for the Nauvoo high council, 1844. Joseph was living at Winter Quarters, 1847. Settled on Beaver Island as a shoemaker, 1854. Ordained elder, 1855. Went on mission to Missouri and Council Bluffs, Iowa, 1855-1856.

  96. Samuel Phelps

    Endowed in Kirtland temple with Joseph Smith, 1836. Ordained into a quorum of seventy, 1836. Resident of Kirtland, 1840. Conference delegate and participant under James Strang at Voree.  Apparently the brother of W. W. Phelps.

  97. Stephen Post

    Resident in Kirtland with Joseph Smith, 1835-1837. Ordained an elder, 1836. Received endowment in the Kirtland temple. Ordained into a quorum of seventy, 1836. Correspondent with the Elders’ Journal, 1838. Missionary in Michigan, 1839-1840. Active under James Strang, 1846-1855. Served as presiding high priest in Pennsylvania, 1847-1848. Present for the coronation of James Strang, 1850.

  98. Warren Post

    Joined church, 1836. In Nauvoo, 1845. Identified as a high priest under James Strang, 1850. Ordained into the quorum of twelve apostles under James Strang, 1850. Arrested unlawfully and persecuted, 1851. Missionary to Council Bluffs, 1850s. One of the witnesses to the Book of the Law of the Lord, 1851. Never denied his testimony. Perhaps the most faithful of the supporters of James Strang.

  99. Darius Race

    Elder in Kirtland, 1836. Ordained elder in Voree, 1846. Ordained high priest in Voree, 1846. Served on high council in Voree, 1846-1847.

  100. Leonard Rich

    Walked from Kirtland to Western Missouri with Joseph Smith, 1834. Joseph Smith wrote: “I would remember Elder Leonard Rich, who was the first one that proposed to the brethren to assist me in obtaining wood for the use of my family, for which I pray my heavenly father to bless him . . . and I shall ever remember him with much gratitude for his testimony of benevolence and respect.” Served on the Kirtland high council, 1835. Ordained one of the seven presidents of seventy, 1835. In the quorum of high priests at Kirtland, 1837. Sustained James Strang at a conference in Kirtland, Ohio, and became president of the stake at Kirtland, organized by James Strang, 1846.

  101. David Rogers

    Ordained elder, 1841. A New York City portrait painter who traveled to Nauvoo to paint Joseph and Emma Smith’s only frontal portraits from life, 1842. Secretary of New York City conference, 1844. In New York City, 1845, probably in the theater with George J. Adams. Presiding elder in New York City, 1847, and affiliated with James Strang. Was involved in the James Strang church with George J. Adams in New York City, 1849. There is disagreement among professional Mormon historians about whether this is the same David Rogers as David W. Rogers, so the sets of data are separated here.

  102. David W. Rogers

    Known to live in New York City, 1832-1833. Baptized by Parley Pratt, 1837. Authored Mormon hymn book in New York City, 1838. Courier to Joseph Smith in Liberty Jail, Clay County, Missouri, 1839. Present in Nauvoo, 1840, 1846. Settled in Iowa, not going to Utah. Custom hymns appear about Voree and James Strang in church newspapers in 1846 and 1847, with “Rogers” as the byline. Other hymns appear from 1849 to 1854 with the byline of his son’s known name, Charles A. Rogers, so this family was associated with James Strang. David W. Rogers was opposed to the Utah Mormons at least to 1852.

  103. Joseph Rose

    Elder, 1835. Visited by Brigham Young and the quorum of the twelve apostles on their first mission, 1835. One of the quorum of seventy, 1836. Personally acquainted with Joseph Smith and introduced friends to Joseph Smith, 1836. Left Far West, Missouri, during persecutions in company with Brigham Young. Ordained a high priest by James Strang, 1846.

  104. Abram Rose

    Elder in Kirtland, 1836. Supported James Strang in Council Bluffs, Iowa, 1854.

  105. John Rudd

    With Samuel H. Smith and others, part of a special Kirtland conference appointed in 1834 to investigate Joseph Smith, which exonerated Joseph Smith. Received special blessings from Joseph Smith for labor and contributions to the Kirtland temple. Received a special blessing from Joseph Smith for opening his heart “in great liberality” in contributing money to Joseph Smith. Moved to Beaver Island to be with James Strang, 1856. Possibly also supporting Strang as early as 1846.

  106. Wilkins J. Salisbury

    Became brother-in-law to Joseph Smith in Kirtland, 1831. A lawyer and blacksmith. One of the quorum of seventy, 1836. Preached in the presence of Joseph Smith, along with Samuel H. Smith and Don Carlos Smith, 1836. Signed statement: “This is to certify that the Smith family do believe in the appointment of J. J. Strang.” Signed statement, “This is to certify that we, the undersigned members of the Smith family, fully accord with the sentiments expressed above,” including “I am satisfied that Joseph appointed J. J. Strang. It is verily so.”

  107. Catherine Smith Salisbury

    The sister of Joseph Smith and Hyrum Smith. Signed statement: “This is to certify that the Smith family do believe in the appointment of J. J. Strang.” Signed statement, “This is to certify that we, the undersigned members of the Smith family, fully accord with the sentiments expressed above,” including “I am satisfied that Joseph appointed J. J. Strang. It is verily so.” Years later tried to distance herself from this, but was infirm and contradictory in her later statement.

  108. Louisa Sanger

    She received her patriarchal blessing from Hyrum Smith, 1843. Mormon folk history says she was sealed to Hyrum Smith, and James Strang may have courted her as a potential polygamous wife. Besides Brigham Young, one of the first to go through the Nauvoo temple endowment, 1845. She carried a communication to Nauvoo for James Strang, 1846. She and her son, William A. Sanger, were strong early supporters of James Strang, 1846 and possibly to 1850.

  109. Jehiel Savage

    An elder in 1839. President of an irregular quorum of seventies organized by Brigham Young, 1846. A high priest with James Strang, 1846. Ordained to be one of the quorum of twelve apostles, 1846. In charge of Beaver Island, 1847. Living on Beaver Island, 1848. One of the witnesses to the Book of the Law of the Lord, 1851. Never denied his testimony. Active on Beaver Island, 1852.

  110. William Savage

    Persecuted in Missouri with Joseph Smith, 1839. Communicated to by Hyrum Smith, June 1844. One of the seven presidents of seventies under James Strang, 1846-1853. In the Order of Enoch in Voree, 1848.

  111. Isaac Scott

    His father was Jacob Scott, who was mentioned in D&C 52:28, and who was ordained a high priest by Joseph Smith in Kirtland, 1831. Isaac Scott was baptized, 1837; lived in Far West, Missouri, 1839; and lived in Nauvoo, 1844. Signed recommendation of Strang as prophet, seer, revelator, and translator, 1846. Ordained a high priest and member of the high council in Voree by James Strang, 1846.

  112. Murray Seaman

    Ordained a priest, 1837. Ordained one of the seventies at Far West, Missouri, under the direction of Brigham Young and Heber C. Kimball, 1839. Large amounts of money were dispersed to him by the high council in Nauvoo. According to Christopher Merkley, Murray Seaman personally met with Joseph Smith before taking a mission, 1842. Joseph Smith and the quorum of twelve apostles met to request him to return to Nauvoo, 1843. One of the seventies on Beaver Island, 1849. Falsely imprisoned ten weeks for his religion, 1851. Justice of the peace and librarian/curator on Beaver Island, 1852. Settled Drummond Island, Lake Huron, as a new Mormon settlement, 1853-1856.  Still recognized as the main pioneer of Drummond Island.

  113. Otis Shumway

    Signed up to walk from Kirtland, Ohio to Western Missouri with Joseph Smith, 1834. Elder, 1835. Resident of Kirtland with Joseph Smith, 1836. Ordained to be one of the seventy, 1838. Traveled from Kirtland, Ohio, to Far West, Missouri, with Joseph Smith, 1838. Persecuted in Missouri with Joseph Smith, 1839. Served on the high council in Voree, 1846-1847.

  114. Samuel Shaw

    The son-in-law of W. W. Phelps.  President of the Chicago branch in early 1844, and author of an early church placard from the Joseph Smith period. One of the earliest strong supporters of James Strang. Rebaptized, reordained an elder, and ordained a high priest by James Strang, 1845. Preached in favor of James Strang in the Nauvoo temple, winter 1845-1846. Sent out as a presiding high priest, 1846. On high council in Voree, 1846-1847. On Beaver Island as “agent of temporal affairs” , 1847-1848. Three-month rebellion on Beaver Island, winter 1848-1849. Gave testimony favoring James Strang at conference on Beaver Island during which the kingdom was established, 1850. Unlawfully imprisoned for ten weeks for his religion, 1851. Active in Chicago and on Beaver Island, 1851-1856.

  115. Aaron Smith, Jr.

    An elder in Kirtland with Joseph Smith, 1833-1835. Endowed in Kirtland temple with Joseph Smith, 1836. Sent as a delegate to conference in Kirtland, ordained a high priest by Joseph Smith, Sr. to co-preside over region northwest of Lake Michigan. Designated as the president of the stake at Walnut Grove, Knox County, Illinois, 1839. Visited Nauvoo with James Strang, February 1844. Wrote to Joseph Smith, May 1844. Mentioned by Joseph Smith in the letter of appointment to James Strang, June 1844. Counselor to the first president, James Strang, 1845, but not assistant president. One of the four witnesses to the Voree plates, 1845. Never denied his testimony. Ordained high priest and counselor to the first president, 1846. Considered James Strang a fallen prophet, 1847, like David Whitmer considered Joseph Smith to be.

  116. Mrs. Joseph Smith, Jr. (Emma Hale)

    The wife of Joseph Smith. Addressed personally in D&C 25. Authored Mormon hymn books in Kirtland and Nauvoo, 1835 and 1841. Did not go west to Utah. Instead, she related that she “recollects well of her husband receiving a letter from Mr. Strang, and holding a council on the subject, and names Hyrum Smith, Willard Richards and John P. Green as present at that council, and also that a letter was sent” to James Strang. She provided contextual details and historical background for Joseph Smith appointing James Strang. Planned to move to Voree in 1847 with the whole Smith family. In 1847 she reportedly believed the Bible, Book of Mormon, Doctrine and Covenants, “and also of James Strang to be beyond successful contradiction.” People interviewing her in 1847 found her “Firm in the faith that her husband wrote or dictated the writing of the letter of James Strang’s appointment to the prophetic office, and has not changed her mind.”

  117. Mrs. Joseph Smith, Sr. (Lucy Mack)

    The mother of Joseph Smith. Signed statement: “This is to certify that the Smith family do believe in the appointment of J. J. Strang.” She personally wrote, “I am satisfied that Joseph appointed J. J. Strang. It is verily so.” William Marks, the bishop under James Strang, arranged to pay the expenses of moving her to Voree, 1846. Wanted to move to Voree with her children, 1847, and bring the Book of Abraham artifacts and other church records with her. Her house is still standing at the Nauvoo, Illinois, historic site.

  118. Joseph Smith, III

    The eldest son of Joseph Smith and Emma Smith, twelve years old when his father was killed in 1844. Appointed as patriarch and member of first presidency in place of his uncle Hyrum Smith, 1846. At a general conference under James Strang it was resolved to “give our prayers daily for Joseph, the son of Joseph, that he may be raised up of God to fill the station to which he has been called by prophecy,” 1849. William Marks was ordained one of the first presidency and spiritual guardian of Joseph Smith, III, 1849. Emma Smith related that her son saw a person “come into a room in Far West, Mo., and told him this church would go to Voree; the boy was only eight years old—“Joseph his father was in jail at the time—“the boy remembers the vision.” One of the first events recorded in his “Memoirs” was this vision about Voree: “There comes to mind a circumstance which occurred about this time (1838) which was attended by some degree of mystery. It was my habit to take a nap in the afternoons upon a bed or couch in the bedroom. The house had two rooms, one the living or ‘keeping’ room and the other a bedroom. Into this latter the door leading from the keeping room opened inwardly, opposite a window in the end of the building. My mother was washing in the larger room and I, lying upon the bed in the chamber, was awakened by someone coming through the door and across the room past me. It was a man apparently from thirty-five to forty-five years of age, sparely built, wearing dark clothing somewhat shabby, and having on his head a rather tall-crowned hat, napless, as was the custom of the time. He passed to the window and turned to come back toward the door, saying as he did so, ‘We will all have to go to the land of Voree.’ Reaching the door he turned again and came back toward the window. As he turned at the window the second time to again pass by the bed he repeated what he had said before, ‘We will all have to go to the land of Voree.’ . . . When the man returned to the door the second time he passed out, as I supposed, into the room where my mother was. I called to her and asked her who the man was. She wanted to know to what man I referred. I told her about the man I had seen in the room and repeated what he had said. She had not seen him, nor did either of us see him after, though we went at once to the door to look for him. He was fairly tall, being a little over medium height, and had a clean shaven face. I relate the circumstance because it impressed me at the time and because it is a mystery that has never since been solved.”   Note—“Voree has been identified nowhere else in American history except as the city in Wisconsin that Joseph Smith commanded James Strang to establish.

  119. Moses Smith

    Preached with Reynolds Cahoon, Alpheus Cutler, and Freeman Nickerson in New York, 1833. Moved to Foxville (now Burlington), Wisconsin, 1835, and established a branch of the church with over one hundred members, 1836. Sent as a delegate to conference in Kirtland, ordained a high priest by Joseph Smith, Sr. to co-preside over region northwest of Lake Michigan. Present with Joseph Smith at a council of seventies meeting in Quincy, Illinois, 1839. Designated the bishop of the stake at Walnut Grove, Knox County, Illinois, 1839. Loaned Joseph Smith several thousand dollars, 1839. Involved in legal and financial matters with Joseph Smith in Nauvoo, 1842. Owned a general store in Nauvoo, making him a colleague of Joseph Smith who also owned a general store, 1842. Involved in getting Wisconsin timber for the Nauvoo House and Nauvoo temple, 1842-1844. Directed by Hyrum Smith to explore Texas, New Mexico, California, as possible church settlements, February 1844. Mentioned in the letter of appointment from Joseph Smith to James Strang, June 1844. Rebaptized and reordained a high priest by James Strang, 1845. Preached the claims of James Strang outside the Nauvoo temple, and was persecuted with knives and pistols, 1846. Member of the quorum of twelve apostles under James Strang, 1846-1849. Died faithful, 1849.

  120. William Smith

    The only surviving brother of Joseph Smith and Hyrum Smith, after 1844. Baptized, 1830. Ordained an elder, 1832. Ordained into the quorum of twelve apostles, 1835. Mentioned in D&C 124:129. Edited the Nauvoo Wasp newspaper. On the Nauvoo City Council, 1842. Illinois state representative from Nauvoo, 1842. Member of the council of fifty. Editing church newspaper, The Prophet, in June 1844 when his brothers were killed. Signed statement: “This is to certify that the Smith family do believe in the appointment of J. J. Strang.” He provided contextual details and historical background for Joseph Smith appointing James Strang. Brigham Young said he had the right to be patriarch, 1844. Ordained patriarch by James Strang, 1846. Continued as apostle under James Strang, 1846. William Smith wrote expressing “his cordial co-operation with President Strang, and that he, and all the Smith family will remove to Voree early in the spring,” 1847. Stood up at the conference and said he knew by revelation that James Strang was the Lord’s anointed, 1847.

  121. Henry Larkin Southworth

    A highly literate member whose diary describes in detail the activities in Boston and the East, including preaching by Samuel Brannan, George J. Adams, John E. Page, and others. He was the clerk of the Boston branch under James Strang, 1847.

  122. Andrew Jackson Squires

    Baptized, 1834. An elder in Kirtland with Joseph Smith, 1835. Joseph Smith defended his case in the high council, 1835. He was supposedly ordained a high priest in Kirtland by Joseph Smith, 1835. In the quorum of seventies, 1836. Apparently still one of the quorum of seventy, when personally calling on Joseph Smith, 1838. Moved to Beaver Island to be with James Strang, 1851.

  123. Milton Stow

    Active in Kirtland, 1834. Resident of Nauvoo with Joseph Smith, 1840-1842. Member of the high council in Voree, 1846-1847.

  124. James J. Strang

    Related to Moses and Aaron Smith, early high priests from Kirtland, Ohio. Guest in the Nauvoo home of Joseph Smith, 1844. Baptized by Joseph Smith and ordained an elder by Hyrum Smith, 1844. Involved in the plans to relocate church elsewhere from Nauvoo, when Joseph Smith was considering Oregon, California, Texas, northern Illinois, and southern Wisconsin, 1844. Appointed by Joseph Smith to succeed him, lead the church, receive revelations for the church, and plant a stake of Zion in Wisconsin (all duties of the first president), 1844.

  125. Hiram Stratton

    Walked with Joseph Smith from Kirtland, Ohio, to Western Missouri, 1834. Ordained into the first quorum of seventy, 1835. As high priest certified confidence in James Strang, 1846. Served on the Voree high council under James Strang, 1847.

  126. James Stray

    Emigrated from Kirtland, Ohio, to Far West, Missouri, with Joseph Smith, 1838. Sustained James Strang at a conference in Kirtland, Ohio, and became a member of the high council of the stake at Kirtland, organized by James Strang, 1846.

  127. Sylvester B. Stoddard

    An in-law of Joseph Smith’s sister Sophronia Smith Stoddard. Active in the church as an elder, conference clerk, and conference president, 1834-1837. Signed charter of Kirtland Safety Society Bank, 1837. Replaced Wilford Woodruff in first quorum of seventy, 1837. Driven from Missouri during persecution, 1839. Converted the early leader Ezra T. Benson, 1839. Present with Joseph Smith at a council of seventies meeting in Quincy, Illinois, 1839. Counselor to the bishop in Quincy, Illinois, when the main church body was there after they fled Missouri and needed temporal aid, 1840. Served on the Nauvoo high council, 1842. Entertained the quorum of twelve with a feast, and Brigham Young said that he “felt thankful on this occasion for the privilege of being with his family in the home of a good member,” 1842. Was on Joseph Smith’s steamboat Maid of Iowa on an expedition to save Joseph Smith, 1843. Sustained James Strang at a conference in Kirtland, Ohio, and became assistant president of the stake at Kirtland, organized by James Strang, 1846. His home and tinsmith shop are still standing at the Nauvoo, Illinois, historic site.

  128. Jonathon Sumner

    Lived in Jackson County, Missouri, during the early period 1831-1833, and lost all of his property to the frontier mob. Emigrated to Voree to be with James Strang. Testified that he heard John P. Greene proclaim that he was intimately acquainted with the appointment of James Strang by Joseph Smith.

  129. Josiah Sumner

    Baptized, 1830. Lived in Jackson County, Missouri, during the early period 1831-1833, and was beaten by a mob. In teachers quorum in Kirtland, Ohio, when teachers were adult men, 1835. Ordained one of the quorum of seventy. Emigrated to Voree to be with James Strang. President of the quorum of elders at Voree, 1846-1848. Lived in a prominent house in Voree, where meetings were held.

  130. Jacob Syfritt

    Baptized in Philadelphia, 1840. Ordained bishop over Philadelphia branch by Hyrum Smith, and was one of the first local bishops, 1841. Bishop over the Philadelphia branch under James Strang, 1846-1848.

  131. Abijah R. Tewksbury

    Represented the large branch in Boston, 1842. Visited in Boston by Brigham Young and the quorum of twelve apostles, 1843. Personally addressed by letter from Joseph Smith and Hyrum Smith, June 1844, and sent the original to James Strang, 1847. Bishop of the Boston branch under James Strang, 1847, an office that he probably held previously under Joseph Smith, and as such was one of the first local bishops.

  132. Ezra Thayer

    Baptized, 1830. Ordained a high priest, 1831. Mentioned throughout the D&C. Purchased the land on which the Kirtland temple was built. Walked with Joseph Smith from Kirtland, Ohio to Western Missouri. Ordained into the first quorum of seventy, 1835. Served on the high council in Adam-ondi-Ahman, Missouri. Associated with James Strang in Rochester, N.Y., and in Michigan.

  133. Charles B. Thompson

    Ordained to be a seventy, 1836. Emigrated to Far West, Missouri, with Joseph Smith, 1838; emigrated to Nauvoo with the church after being driven by persecution from Missouri. Received a letter of recommendation from the seventies quorum, 1839. Authored 256-page book, Evidences in Proof of the Book of Mormon, 1841. Active as a seventy, missionary, and agent for the Times and Seasons, and president and clerk of conferences, all in New York state, 1839-1846. A high priest under James Strang, 1846-1848. “Mr. Thompson came here and testified that God had revealed to him that prophet Strang was a true prophet and the President and lawful leader of the church.”

  134. Samuel S. Thornton

    Baptized in Kirtland, 1836. He was confirmed by Joseph Smith personally, and later ordained a seventy.  He married H. Jane Hickenlooper in Nauvoo. Emigrated from Council Bluffs, Iowa, and active on Beaver Island 1855-1856.

  135. Allen Wait

    Walked partway with Joseph Smith from Kirtland, Ohio, to Western Missouri, 1834. Deacon and conference clerk near Kirtland, 1837. Missionary in New York, 1844. Ordained a high priest and member of the high council in Voree, 1846. Signed recommendation of Strang as prophet, seer, revelator, and translator, 1846.

  136. Bro. Walker

    An African-American member in New York City, who was a precedent to the church by being ordained to the high priesthood at a general conference of the church under James Strang. “He [James Strang] remarked that the impression had gone forth that a colored man could not hold the priesthood, which was not true. . . . Pres. Strang proposed by revelation that Bro. Walker (colored) be ordained an Elder, which was concurred in unanimously.” A day earlier Walker had participated in the conference and “Rejoiced at the spirit manifested in the Conference, and was a witness of the manifestation of the power of God as exhibited in the latter day dispensation.” Two weeks later he made a motion in defense of James Strang at a special meeting. This may have been the Samuel Walker who was included in the Beaver Island census in 1854, and who brought his wife and eight children from Ogdensburg, N.Y., to Beaver Island in 1856. This parallels the case of Joseph Smith ordaining Elijah Abel as an African-American elder in 1836, and his being ordained a seventy in 1841. Other Mormons did not follow these examples until 1978.

  137. George Walters

    One of the big landowners in Caldwell County, Missouri, the location of Far West. Associated with James Strang, 1846-1849.

  138. Dwight Webster

    Brother-in-law to Wilford Woodruff. Boarded with the family of Wilford Woodruff, ordained a priest by Wilford Woodruff, 1838. Eunice Woodruff was married to him by her brother Wilford Woodruff, 1841. Agent for the Times and Seasons in Connecticut, 1842. Supported James Strang from Burlington, Iowa, 1848-1849, along with other Woodruff family members.

  139. James Whitehead

    Baptized by Heber C. Kimball in England, 1837. A scribe for Brigham Young in England, where he was ordained a high priest, 1841. In the quorum of high priests at Nauvoo, 1842. Said to be the private secretary of Joseph Smith in Nauvoo. Admitted in a notarized affidavit that Joseph Smith wrote the letter appointing James Strang, but James Whitehead did not feel that the appointment was conclusive.

  140. David Whitmer

    One of the three witnesses of the Book of Mormon. One of six original members of the church. President of the church in Missouri, 1834. Addressed throughout the D&C. A high priest in Far West, Missouri, 1838. Hiram Page wrote to James Strang in early 1846 indicating that David Whitmer, John Whitmer, and Hiram Page received a tract about his succession claims and “read it with joy and gladness,” and “all the witnesses of the Book of Mormon living in that region received the news with gladness,” and addressed James Strang “as a prophet of God to tell them what to do.” In a second letter from April 1847, they also invited James Strang to come to Missouri and get the “church records, and manuscript revelations.”

  141. Jacob Whitmer

    One of the eight witnesses to the Book of Mormon, 1830. Jacob Whitmer owned a Book of Commandments. A high priest in Far West, Missouri, 1838. Hiram Page wrote to James Strang in early 1846 indicating that he, along with David Whitmer and John Whitmer, received a tract about his succession claims and that they “could not rest till they had gone and communicated the glad news to their brother [Jacob Whitmer] who lived at some distance,” and “all the witnesses of the Book of Mormon living in that region received the news with gladness,” and addressed James Strang “as a prophet of God to tell them what to do.” In a second letter from April 1847, they also invited James Strang to come to Missouri and get the “church records, and manuscript revelations.”

  142. John Whitmer

    One of the eight witnesses to the Book of Mormon, 1830. Scribe for translation of Book of Mormon. Baptized by Oliver Cowdery, 1830. Addressed throughout the D&C. Designated by revelation to keep a sacred history of the church (D&C 69), as the first official church historian, 1831. Scribe for revelations of Joseph Smith, and draft of Book of Commandments. Assistant president of the church in Missouri, 1834. Edited the Messenger and Advocate, 1835-1837. Helped purchase Far West, Missouri. As the church historian, he said that Joseph Smith appointed James Strang as his successor. Hiram Page wrote to James Strang in early 1846 indicating that David Whitmer, John Whitmer, and Hiram Page received a tract about his succession claims and “read it with joy and gladness,” and “all the witnesses of the Book of Mormon living in that region received the news with gladness,” and addressed James Strang “as a prophet of God to tell them what to do.” In a second letter from April 1847, they also invited James Strang to come to Missouri and get the “church records, and manuscript revelations.” John Whitmer wrote in his manuscript history: “God, knowing all things, prepared a man whom he visited by an angel of God and showed him where there were some ancient record hid, and also put in his heart to desire of faith to grant him power to establish a stake to Zion in Wisconsin Territory, whose name is James J. Strang. Now at first Smith was unfavorably disposed to grant him this request, but being troubled in spirit and knowing from the things that were staring him in the face that his days must soon be closed, therefore he enquired of the Lord and behold the Lord said ‘Appoint James J. Strang a prophet, seer and revelator unto my Church, for thou shalt thereby do a mention thy cup is bitter, etc.’ Shortly after the appointment of James Strang, the mob gathered and took by stratagem Joseph and Hyrum Smith and conveyed them to Carthage, the seat of justice in and for the county of Hancock as if to try them by the law of the land for their crimes, they murdered them and thus the Lord’s anointed fell by the brutal hand of man and they are gone the way of all the earth and James Strang reigns in the place of Smith, the author and proprietor of the Book of Mormon.”

  143. Clark L. Whitney

    Probably the brother of bishop Newel K. Whitney, and best friend of bishop George Miller. Signed charter of Joseph Smith’s Kirtland Safety Society Bank, 1837. Persecuted in Missouri, 1839. Appointed by Brigham Young as a presiding high priest, 1844. Emigrating from Missouri to Beaver Island, 1850, but died in Voree in 1851; his family was on Beaver Island, 1855.

  144. Samuel Whitney

    Probably the father of bishop Newel K. Whitney, and associate of bishop George Miller. Baptized personally by Joseph Smith, 1835. Emigrating from Texas to Beaver Island, 1850. Living at Voree, 1850-1854, and then Beaver Island, 1854.

  145. Catharine Wilkie

    Persecuted in Missouri with the church, 1839. In March 1844, Joseph Smith visited her, and recorded an extensive and remarkable blessing on her and her husband John Wilkie for their sacrifice and enormous contribution of gold and silver to the Nauvoo temple. The blessing said in part, “ . . . may they be shielded from the powers of Satan and the influence of designing men . . .” She wrote to James Strang in 1855, “Please record my name in the church books.” Emigrating to Beaver Island, 1856.

  146. Samuel Williams

    Resident of Kirtland, Ohio, emigrated to Missouri, then to Nauvoo. Served as the elders quorum president in Nauvoo. Mentioned in  D&C 124:137. Supporter of James Strang, 1849-1854. Emigrating to Beaver Island, 1851.

  147. Aphek Woodruff

    The father of Wilford Woodruff. Baptized by Wilford Woodruff, 1838. Ordained to be a high priest and patriarch by Wilford Woodruff, 1844. Along with his wife, his daughter Eunice, and his son-in-law Dwight Webster, and others, he leaned towards James Strang while emigrating through Iowa.

  148. Benjamin G. Wright

    According to John E. Page and Christopher Merkley, he was active in Canada, winter 1836-1837. Ordained a high priest under James Strang, 1846. Presiding high priest over western Wisconsin, 1847. Member of the high council in Voree, 1847. Ordained counselor to the stake president at Voree, 1848. In the Order of Enoch at Voree, 1848. Ordained president of the stake at Voree, 1849. Present on Beaver Island, 1850-1851, while living in Voree as president of the stake at Voree. Appointed and ordained “counselor to the king” , 1851. In the “king’s privy” council, 1852. A high priest, 1852. On Beaver Island as commissioner of highways, 1852. Galilee town justice, Beaver Island 1853. Galilee town supervisor, Beaver Island, 1853. High priest at Galilee, 1855. Managed Wright’s Wharf, Port of Galilee, Beaver Island, 1855-1856.

  149. Phineas Wright

    According to John E. Page and Christopher Merkley, he was active in Canada, winter 1836-1837. Active in Illinois, 1841. Signed testimony favoring James Strang, 1846. Ordained one of the seven presidents of seventies under James Strang, 1847. High council met at his house in Voree, 1848. Charter member of the Order of Enoch at Voree, 1848. Called to be one of the quorum of twelve apostles under James Strang, 1849. On Beaver Island for conferences every year, 1849-1856. Located at Troy and Enoch, Beaver Island. Appointed lighthouse keeper, 1855. Appointed county judge of probate, 1856.

  150. Joseph Younger

    Accompanied Joseph Smith while Joseph was in the custody of the sheriff, and camped with him on the road, 1841. Missionary, 1842-1844. One of the seventies under James Strang, 1846-1847.



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One example of our
concise priesthood lineage

Prophet Joseph Smith, 1829

Ebenezer Page, 1830
(Early Mormon in N.Y., Missouri, brother of John E. Page,
Later an Apostle at Voree, Wis., and Beaver Island)


Elder Wingfield Watson, 1858
(Lived on Beaver Island)

Elder Joseph H. Hickey, 1907
(Son of L.D. Hickey who lived at Palmyra, N.Y., Nauvoo, Ill.,
Voree, Wis., and was an apostle on Beaver Island)


Elder Steve Barany, 1953
(Son-in-law of Joseph H. Hickey, died in 2010 at 95)

Others

 

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© 1996-2013 Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints.  All Rights Reserved.
The First Presidents of this Church were Joseph Smith Jr. 1830-1844, and James J. Strang 1844-1856.
The First Presidency was at Voree, Wisconsin 1844-1850, and St. James (Beaver Island), Michigan 1850-1856.

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